Speed Training with Nick Sorensen

Nick S.jpg

By James Walker CCS, STM, BioSig, Master Trainer

Nick Sorensen trained with AE most of his 10 year NFL career during his off seasons, beginning in June of 2002, after being drafted and released by the Miami Dolphins. That first year we worked with him for five and a half weeks prior to the pre-season camp.

After the initial assessment, we focused on improving his explosiveness, lean muscle mass, his lower core function, flexibility, sprint technique, and reminding him of the correlation between all of those things and his speed. In addition, we addressed his scar tissue needs, in the shoulders, rotator cuff, and lower legs, which inhibited muscle recruitment and performance, along with a few structural balance issues.

Nick never had an issue with body-fat ratios or fat composition, due to clean-healthy eating habits, even in the off season his body-fat was in the 6% and during the season 4%. When Nick began, his best forty-yard time was 4.41 seconds, when he left for camp his best time was 4.35 seconds.

In 2003 we wanted to make him completely healthy, muscular, and strong from the previous season's injuries. By camp with the Jaguars Nick was performing 135 lb dips, 50 lb close grip pull-ups, and 225 jerk presses, all for 3 reps. Likewise his sprinting technique was superb, with excellent angles, tempos, power, and limb placement. His best 40-yard times were 4.28 and 4.23 seconds.

In 2004 we started early as well, working around an elbow injury that he sustained at the end of the 2003 season. Although his time with us was limited due to team obligations and constraints but our goal was to increase his lean muscle mass, strength, explosiveness, over all flexibility, and muscle balance.

During the remainder of his career we worked with Nick through and around injuries to the elbow, shoulder, and lower leg, team off-season training restrictions, releases, transitions, and new team auditions. We would try and maintain all his performance qualities, muscle mass, strength, speed, power, range of motion, structural balance, scar tissue, and any minor injury concerns.

Through it all he learned to be proactive, disciplined, consistent, informed, healthier, and prepared in all phases of his self-care. Nick has been one of the fastest players on each of his teams, the Rams, Jaguars, Browns, and in the NFL. He maintained his 4.2s speed, until his retirement as a result of a neck injury in 2010.

‘Train Safe, Smart, & Results Driven’

 

 

 

What’s Up, Albert & The 300yd Shuttle?

By James Walker, CCS, STM, BioSig, Master Trainer

In this day and age of technology (cell phones, ipods, laptops, aps, internet, google, etc) that makes gathering information very accessible it’s amazing that so much incorrect and ignorant information permeates the airwaves, internet, and newsprint spheres. And this comes from journalist or in this case sports journalists who we used to rely on for accurate information! Especially since correct and reliable information is only a phone call or keystroke away.

There are countless university exercise science professors and sports-performance-strength coaches, all eagerly ready to be interviewed by some famous sports journalist concerning Albert Haynesworth’s struggle in the 300-yard shuttle. Why can’t he pass it or how should he have prepared in order to pass the easy or hard, depending on the commentator, 300 yd-shuttle test. “He needs more cardio”, “why didn’t his trainer prepare him”, “why didn’t he lose weight”, oh yeah he did lose weight, about 35 lb, “so why didn’t he pass”, or “just because he lost weight doesn’t mean he’s in football shape”, right?

I know all of my former professors, strength coaches, and exercise specialist who have mentored me the past 30 years cringe every time they hear, read, or see the responses from all of the media experts.

The 300-yard shuttle run consists of sprinting 25-yards down and back six times touching the line with the foot in order to complete 300 yards total distance. The times may range from 56 seconds for football receivers and defensive backs to 73 seconds for offensive and defensive linemen. After completion the participant rests 3-5 minutes (3 & ½ for the NFL Washington Redskins) then repeats the test a second time. The times can then be averaged or compared to determine the athlete’s fitness level.

The purpose of the 300-yard shuttle run is to test maximal anaerobic-sprint endurance and/or conditioning. In order to attain a reliable score the participant must sprint at maximum effort and not pace themselves. The general testing populations are sports that involve anaerobic-sprint endurance like-.basketball, hockey, rugby, and soccer.

Now I must confess that when I had to take Testing and Measurement and Statistics decades ago I thought I’d never use any of it but I’ve consistently relied on and utilized the information over and over, especially administering performance assessments and analyzing training data.

All test must be valid, reliable, and objective, all interrelated values and that the measurement must measure the component that it supposed to measure; measure the component consistently; and result in similar scores regardless of the administer.

Let’s look at a quick review of those terms valid, reliable, and objective.

Test validity refers to the degree to which the test measures a specific component that it is intended to measure. The test should contain tasks that reflect those specific components to be measured or it’s content validity.

Test reliability refers to the degree to which the test yields consistent and stable scores over repeated trials and time. Reliability depends upon how strict the test is conducted and how motivated the participant is to perform the test.

Test objectivity refers to the degree to which the test can be measured repeatedly and reliably by various testers with minimum subjectivity.

So in spite of how you may feel about Albert and his conditioning it’s amazing that this test is used to test football players, yet alone a 300 lb lineman. Considering that the average play last between 4-5 seconds, why would you test something that last 50-70 seconds? Does this sound valid, reliable, or objective?

First of all, 4-5 seconds of maximal effort utilize absolute strength, power, and speed, all anaerobic bio-components that involve IIB fast-twitch muscle fibers and alactic-glycolytic energy systems.

Secondly, 56-73 seconds of maximal effort (actually slightly sub-maximal) utilize strength and speed endurance that involves IIA fast-twitch muscle fibers and lactic-glycolytic energy systems. The two are very different in their respective functions and actions.

Thirdly, there is another sub-maximal speed endurance IIA fiber that utilizes a glycolytic-oxidative energy system.

Fourthly, none of these are aerobic which starts to kick in after several minutes of continuous sub-maximal effort that involve slow–twitch IA muscle fibers and primarily an oxidative energy system.

In the exercise science community it really doesn’t make since. So when these experts see test such as the 300-yard shuttle or parts of the NFL combine test they cringe, shake their heads, and wonder if any of them ever picks up an exercise science journal or text.

In summary the test is not a very good indicator of anaerobic alactic power required for football. It does not make sense to any knowledgeable exercise scientist. A better test for football conditioning would involve maximal efforts of 4-5 second that are repeated numerous times with 15-30 seconds of recovery to simulate the huddle. Watch the game, doesn’t that make more since?           

‘Train Safe, Smart, & Results Driven’

                                    

The Hotel Workout

By James Walker, CCS, STM, Biosig, Master Trainer

 

I call this the Hotel workout but it can be done anywhere, in little time, no excuses…the hotel didn’t have a gym, the gym was too crowded, I didn’t know how to use the equipment, etc, etc…Remember at the end of the day, week, month, and year, something is better than nothing! So ‘Just Do It’!

     Perform this workout in a circuit fashion, going from the first exercise to the second and to the third, i.e., A1, A2, A3, doing three rounds for 10 reps or 3 x 10. This will helps create the volume and the physiological response, i.e., metabolic elevation, growth hormone production, muscle growth, and fat loss that’s desired.

     Time permitting you could do up to 5 circuits or rounds. This program is do-able, convenient, and accessible for you, anywhere or time, no excuses! This can be done on a Monday/Wednesday or Tuesday/Thursday or Monday/Wednesday/Friday or Tuesday/Thursday/Saturday schedule.

Below is a brief description of a Two or Three Day Workout Format:

Day 1 – 10 reps each for 3 sets/rounds.

A1. standing bodyweight squat;  – with feet hip width apart or slightly wider and hands on waist, lower body   down towards floor as far as possible on a 3-4 tempo and return on a 2 tempo. 10 reps.

A2. incline pull up with towel or rope; - with a knot on the end (requires a secure door or rail or banister; or   wedge middle of a folded towel between door and door frame, shut, secure, or lock the door so it doesn’t open and will safely support your body weight; or wrap a towel around a rail or banister that’s strong and sturdy  enough to support your weight; hold the ends of the towel in each hand and position feet on floor close to the bottom of door or rail, lean body away from the door as far as possible, support your weight with the towel and your arms, pull body up to hands or towel on a 2 tempo and return on a 3-4 tempo. 10 reps.

A3. Lying hip lifts; – lay on the floor with your hands by sides and your feet up towards the ceiling, lift your hipsoff the floor 2-3 inches or as high as possible on a 1 tempo and return on a 2 tempo. 10-20 reps.

Day 2  – 10 reps each for 3 rounds.

A1. standing split squat;  – in a lunge stance with one foot forward and the other foot back, on forefoot with heel raised, lower torso down towards floor as far as possible on a 3-4 tempo and return on a 2 tempo. 10 reps.

A2. push up against a wall or on the floor; – with hands against the wall, feet hip width apart approximately 3-5 feet from the wall, lean towards the wall, lower torso towards the wall on a 3-4 tempo and return on a 2 tempo;   or in a push up position with hands and feet or knees on floor, lower torso towards the floor on a 3-4 tempo and return on a 2 tempo. 10 reps.

A3. Crunch; - laying on the floor with both legs bent and hands by sides on floor, slide your hands down    towards your hips and raise your torso up off the floor 2-3 inches on a 1 tempo and return on a 1 tempo. 10-20 reps.

Day 3  – 10 reps for 3 rounds.

A1. standing good-mornings;  – with a hands by ears and elbow out to the sides and feet hip width apart, keep chest up and shoulders back, push hips back as far as possible and bend torso forward towards the floor (bow position) on a 3-4 tempo and return on a 2 tempo. 10-20 reps.

A.2. seated dip between chairs; – position your body in a seated or semi-squat position between two chairs of equal size with body supported by each hand on a chair seat or with your back and hips over the edge of the   bed with hands by sides on bed for support, the legs and feet are out in front on the floor, lower the hips & torso down towards the floor as far as possible on a 3-4 tempo and return on a 2 tempo. 10 reps.

A3. Side hip lifts; - lay on one side supported by elbow and forearm against the floor with your feet slightly straddled (one forward & one back), raise your hips up off the floor as high as possible on a 1 tempo and return on a 2 tempo. 10 reps each side.

Remember take your time and don’t sweat it. Even if this is easy or only takes 10 minutes at the end of the week, month, and year you will have done much more work and burned many more calories as opposed to doing zero!   Each round should take 2 -3 minutes, followed by a 1-2 minute rest period. The entire workout should take between 10-20 minutes depending on the length of your rest periods.

     ‘Train Safe, Smart, & Results Driven’

Training Principles, Part Nine - Nutrition & Supplementation 101 Con’t

By James Walker CCS, STM, BioSig, Master Trainer

Nutrition Con’t

d) Fats - consist of all oils from flesh, nuts, and plants including: butter, margarine, mayonnaise, vegetables, borage oil, flaxseed oil, CLA oil, GLA oil, beef, chicken, fish, lamb, egg yolk, turkey, and pork, and vitamins A, D, E, and K. Intake may be between 15-30% of total food intake, 1 gram of fat = 9 calories. Intake should be .3 gm (.4 gm if under 10/14 % body fat for males/females) per lb of body weight. So a 150 lb person take 45 gm per day and a 200 lb person 60 gm per day. The exemption to this is supplementation with omega 3 fish oil. We recommend taking 5-35 grams of omega–3 fatty acid such as Krill, salmon, omega 3, GLA, CLA, EPA, DHA, or EFA daily.

 

·      Eat lean choices of beef, pork, chicken, and lamb (cut off and discard extra fat)

·      Dietary fats are essential to the body and help to carry the fat-soluble vitamins.

·      Fats provide energy.

·      Fats surround and protect certain organs (heart, kidney, and liver).

·      Essential fatty acids help the liver to transport and breakdown fat and cholesterol.

·      Essential fatty acid help fat loss.

·      Essential fatty acid such as DHA help cognitive or brain function.

·      Essential fatty acid such as EPA help reduce inflammation and promote a healthy heart.

·      Choose monounsaturated fats such as olive oil, peanut oil, or oil with instead of trans-fats.

·      See vitamin function of A, D, E, and K.

e) Vitamins - consists of A, B, C, D, E, and K and are found in the foods that we eat, except D, which is also produced in the body with the help of sunlight. We recommend taking a daily multivitamin supplement to assist in your training.

 

·      Vitamin A found in fish oils and converted from carrots (carotene) helps tissue growth and repair, RNA production, and protects certain membranes from infection.

·      Vitamin B found in vegetables and animal tissue they help provide the body with energy, convert carbohydrates into glucose, metabolize fats and proteins, and aid in nervous system function and nerve health.

·      Vitamin C found in fruits and vegetables helps to heal tissue, form red blood cells, fight infections, reduce allergic reactions, maintains connective tissue, replenishes adrenaline, and protects vitamins B, A, and E against oxidation.

·      Vitamin D found in animal tissue, plant tissue, and fish-liver oils, and is produced in the body by exposure to sunlight, helps in the absorption and utilization of calcium and phosphorus, the development of bone and teeth , and nervous system function.

·      Vitamin E found in whole raw seeds, nuts, soybean, and cold-pressed vegetable oils, helps prevent vitamin A and other fatty acids from breaking down with other substances into harmful toxins, protects tissue, cells, and certain vitamins from aging, oxidation, and destruction. Enhances the endurance of heart, lung, and muscle cells.

·      Vitamin K manufactured in the intestines with the presence of certain milk related bacteria and in kelp, alfalfa, green vegetables, yogurt, egg yolks, fish-liver oils, safflower oil, and blackstrap molasses, helps blood to clot, carbohydrates to be stored in the body, and the liver to function normal.

f) Minerals - consist of calcium, chlorine, phosphorus, potassium, magnesium, sodium, zinc, chromium, iron, selenium, vanadium, etc…There are at least17 essential minerals that the body needs. Some are found in the body and others in foods. We recommend taking a daily multi mineral supplement.

 

·      Minerals are necessary for many mental and physical abilities.

·      Minerals are in bone, teeth, tissue, muscle, blood, and nerves.

·      Minerals assist in brain, heart, and nervous system functions as well as the building of bones and allowing physiological aspects to occur for athletics and everyday movement activities.

·      Minerals enhance muscle response, transmit messages and assist in the nervous, digestive, metabolic, hormonal, and endocrine systems. They also help in the utilization of nutrients from food.

·      Minerals help maintain water balance throughout the body and blood and tissue ph balance.

 Nutritional Summary-Recommendations:

1.    Daily water intake should be between 75-140 fl oz depending on your body weight and climate conditions.

2.    Daily protein intake should consists of a variety: beef, buffalo, chicken, exotic meats, fish, lamb, lean pork, shellfish, turkey, etc, and be between 150-400 gm depending on your body weight and goals.

3.    Daily carbohydrate intake should consists of mostly vegetables, especially leafy and green ones but reds and yellows also and some nuts and fruits, mostly low glycemic ones depending on your composition and may be consumed freely with little restriction if consumed without heavy sauces and oils.

4.    Take a daily multi-vitamin/mineral supplement.

5.    Take a daily multi-mineral.

6.    Take a omega-3 fatty acid supplement and vitamin D3 supplement.

7.    Take the post workout shake or meal – it is extremely important for muscle and strength development, recovery, and hormonal balance, which may be in supplement form for optimal absorption. Try to limit protein/carbohydrate supplement to the post workout meal.

8.    Learn to eat a variety of real foods, the proper type, time, amount, and portion, 4-8 meals per day.

9.    Protein-amino acid supplementation may be used during certain circumstances, meals, during workouts, or after workouts.

REFERENCES–

  1. Paul Chek– “The Golf Biomechanics Manual”; “Scientific Back Training”;
  2. Charlie Francis – “Training for Speed”.
  3. Jurgen Hartmann and Harold Tunnemann –“Fitness and Training for All Sports”.
  4. Michael Leahy – “Active Release Techniques Soft Tissue Management System”.
  5. Richard Magill – “Motor Learning Concepts and Applications”.
  6. Charles Poliquin – “Modern Trends in Strength training”; “The Poliquin Principles”; “Manly Weight    Loss”; “Winning the Arms Race”.
  7. Mark Guthrie - “Coaching Track & Field Successfully”.
  8. Jonny Bowden - “living the Low Carb Life”.     
  9. Mario DiPasquale - “The Anabolic Solution”; “The Metabolic Diet”.   
  10. Harvey Newton - “Explosive Lifting for Sports”.    
  11. Steven Fleck & William Kraemer - “The Ultimate Training System - Periodization Breakthrough!”     
  12. Bill Phillips - “Sports Supplement Review”.                                                                     

‘Train Safe, Smart, & Results Driven’

Training Principles, Part Seven - Basic Sprint Mechanics

By James Walker CCS, STM, BioSig, Master Trainer

 If you’re not blessed to have a biomechanics coach or fortunate enough to work with a competent sprint coach, no one explains or teaches you correct sprint mechanics. Even having a speed & conditioning coach you may not receive the technical or biomechanical information necessary to improve sprinting. Instead you may get an over indulgence of volume running or gimmick training. I’m not suggesting that some devices can’t enhance your speed but they should be a supplement to proper mechanics, structural integrity, muscle fiber recruitment, and overall strength. Here are the basics of sprinting.

1. Sprint Running Mechanics – to run at a fast pace that requires a high or intense neuromuscular effort. The basics of sprinting can be summed up into three phases - start phase, drive phase, and acceleration phase.

a) Start Phase - may be from a two, three, or four point stance, requiring strength and power to over come inertia. Below is a checklist of proper mechanics:

·      Head position-should be down with chin near the collar and neck relaxed.

·      Torso position-(two & three point stances) should be achieved with the hips being higher than the head or hips raised with the shoulders slightly forward of the hands.

·      Arm & hand position-finger tips or hands should be on the line (in a four point stance) or the opposite side hand to the front foot (in a three point stance) with the other arm extended back slightly higher than the hips.

·      Leg & feet position-should be determined by the feet position close (bunched), medium, or elongated. The front foot should be approximately one foots length from the start line with a 90 degree knee angle, while the back foot should be positioned to allow a 120 degree knee angle (this is also the stronger and/or more coordinated leg. Both heels are raised with the front bearing the most weight.

b) Drive Phase - coming out of the start to over come inertia from the stationary position or stance to achieve a 45-degree body lean angle.

·      Head position-should be looking down at the ground but relaxed (the head position dictates the body or torso position).

·      Torso position-should be 45 degree lean angle.

·      Arm & hand position-should be relaxed with a 90 degree angle at the elbow and strong powerful alternating elbow drive to the rear on the backswing.

·      Leg & feet position-feet should be dorsiflexed (toes and ankles pulled up toward the shins) with the ball of the foot (forefoot) striking the ground behind the hips. The legs should drive down toward the ground in a powerful motion (like auto pistons or punching the heavy bag) after the heel is pulled up into the hamstring area (this actually precedes the leg drive). Tighter knee angle and knee lift equals greater striking force. The first few foot strike are critical, they must be powerful and explosive (importance of leg, hip, back, & core strength).

c) Acceleration Phase - post drive phase to reach the maximum running speedwith a 70 degree body lean angle.

·      Head position-should be neutral with the chin level to the ground but relaxed (the head position dictates the body or torso position).

·      Torso position-should be 70 degree lean angle.

·      Arm & hand position-should be relaxed with a 90 degree angle at the elbow and strong powerful alternating elbow drive to the rear on the backswing. The hand or fist should automatically return into the front-swing but only to shoulder level.

·      Leg & feet position-feet should be dorsiflexed (toes and ankles pulled up toward the shins) with the ball of the foot (forefoot) striking the ground under the hips. The legs should drive down toward the ground in a powerful drive motion (focus on striking the ground under the hips) after the heel is pulled up into the hamstring area, which facilitates knee lift or a tight knee angle (this actually precedes the leg drive). Tighter knee angle and knee lift equals greater striking force.

‘Train Safe, Smart, & Results Driven’

Training Principles, Part Five - Principles Of Exercise Science Con’t

By James Walker CCS, STM, BioSig, Master Trainer

Training principles of exercise science con’t…

16. Reps and Sets Relationship – reps and sets have an inverse relationship, fewer reps require more sets while more reps require fewer sets.

·      In part this based on the motor learning principle of “repeated effort”- when learning a new skill, task, or lesson the more times it is repeated the easier it is to remember or to perform.

·      Consequently this “repeated effort” or practice will increase the number of times that the particular muscle fiber type and its corresponding energy system gets used thereby making future efforts easier and the muscle more conditioned.

·      e.g., motor skill of riding a bike or learning a different language or exercise, the more the effort is repeated the greater the learning capacity.

17. Super Compensation – the amount of time required for the body to fully recover from the previous workout or workouts.

·      There should be full recovery prior to repeating the same muscle workout for the best gains.

·      This will result in strength increases of 1-2% or by 1-2 repetitions each week.

·      Optimal increases will not occur with out the proper rest, recovery, and regeneration.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                              18. Technique and Posture – proper form and posture are necessary for correct muscle recruitment and optimal strength gains.

·      If a movement cannot be performed with the correct technique, form, and posture it should be stopped.

·      An assessment should be made to determine the reason, so that the necessary corrections can be made.

·      Remember correct technique and posture will optimize neural drive to the correct muscles and will prevent faulty muscle recruitment patterns.

·      E.g., excessive forward lean vs. upright torso in the squat, or treadmill vs. running outside.

19. Tempo-is the pace, rhythm, and time required for each repetition.

·      Planned tempo use will ensure correct muscle fiber and energy system recruitment, and will reduce injury and faulty motor patterns.

·      Tempo is usually expressed in counts e.g., 302, 301, 30X or 402, 401, 40X, or 502, 501, 50X, that are normal but may be 31X, 512, 911 counts.

·      The first number represents the negative (eccentric) phase of the rep, usually expressed in a 2-9 range.

·      The second number usually represents the midway point, usually expressed in a 0-2 range.

·      The last number represents the positive (concentric) phase, usually expressed in a X-2 range.

·      e.g., a 302 tempo for an arm curl, starting position at the bottom with the weight in front of thigh, a 2 count is performed while the weight is curled up to the shoulders, a 0 pause at the top or midway position,  a 3 count is done while lowering the weight to the start.

‘Train Safe, Smart, & Results Driven’

Training Principles, Four - Principles Of Exercise Science Con’t

By James Walker CCS, STM, BioSig, Master Trainer

Training principles of exercise science con’t…

10. Overload and Progressive Loading – neuromuscular adaptation occurs as a result of progressive amounts of overload or in other words your body adapts to progressive small amounts of stress (fictitious Greek wrestler Milo carrying the calf until it’s a full grown bull).

·      This adaptation is optimal when the progression of stress or overload is gradual and in small increments of 1-5% of the working intensity level (also called the Kaizen Principle of constant and never ending improvement by increasing in small increments over a long period of time).

11. Over Training - is caused by constant training that does not allow adequate time for recovery, regeneration, or super compensation to occur.

·      Symptoms may include irritability, increase in injury, healing time, resting heart rate, normal blood pressure, illness, change in mood and appetite, decrease in immune system and performance.

·      In addition to excessive inflammation, scar tissue formation, over compensation of other body parts, soft tissue strain and tear, bone fractures, and a weakened level of strength and conditioning.

·      Example-scar tissue, traps or hamstring or calve, get volunteer

12. Periodization or Periodized Training - is a pre-planed training plan, which consists of short or long-term cycles (days vs. weeks vs. months), with changes in the workout at regular intervals.

·      By manipulating your training variables, such as variations in exercises, reps, sets, and weight load intensities you will maximize your progress and motivation, and help to prevent plateaus, injuries, and over-training.

13. Posture, Stability, and Synergist Muscles – are muscles that assist the primary (larger) muscles by helping to hold a position to achieve the desired action. This help is called synergist.

·      e.g., when sprinting the ankle dorsi- flexor muscles and the toe extensor muscles put the foot in the correct position prior to the foot strike.

·      The synergist may also assist in achieving a particular action.

·      e.g; in elbow flexion the arm biceps may get assistance from the forearm brachioradialis muscle.

·      Often these muscles are the smaller muscles and/or the secondary actions of neighboring muscles.

14. Reflex Inhibition –when a muscle is injured by repetitive use, trauma, faulty motor patterns, imbalances, or scar tissue, the central nervous system shuts down the neural drive to the muscle (turns off the muscle) to protect it from further injury.

15. Rep and Set variation – rep and set ranges should be varied for each training cycle (2-4 weeks for advance trainees, 5-8 weeks for experienced trainees, 9-12 weeks for intermediate trainees, and 13-16 weeks for beginners).

·      This will allow total muscle and strength development and will reduce overuse syndromes.

·      For example a muscle hypertrophy workout cycle: cycle One - 6 reps x 6 sets; cycle Two - 12 reps x 3 sets; cycle Three - 8 reps x 5 sets; and cycle Four - 10 reps x 4 sets.

·      For example relative strength or power workout cycle: cycle One - 5 reps x 5 sets; cycle Two - 2 reps x 8 sets; cycle Three - 4 reps x 6 sets; and cycle Four - 1 reps x 10 sets.

·      The rep ranges should be based on your objectives, whether for relative strength and power or for hypertrophy strength or for muscle endurance, whichever need is the priority.

·      The set ranges will help determine and influence the conditioning of the muscle fibers trained.

 ‘Train Safe, Smart, & Results Driven’

Training Principles, Part Three -Principles Of Exercise Science Con’t

By James Walker CCS, STM, BioSig, Master Trainer

Training principles of exercise science con’t…

7. Muscle Balance – each muscle action or group has an opposite muscle action or group (agonist vs. antagonist).

·      e.g. triceps vs. biceps, must maintain a mutual balance in strength and flexibility to function properly.

·      In performance activity the antagonist muscles may act as a brake to slow down acceleration e.g. the elbow flexors act as a brake to the elbow extensors in a punch, so they need to be strong to perform this task.

·      Demonstrate-a throw or punch or sprint.

8. Muscle Fiber Type and Energy System – there are two basic muscle fiber types, slow twitch (IA) and fast twitch (IIAo, IIA & IIB). Each muscle fiber type has a corresponding energy system that supplies it and determines its action and performance parameters.

·      Slow twitch (IA) utilizes oxygen (aerobic) as its primary energy source, 3 minutes or longer duration and has an intensity threshold of 25% or less of the persons strength capacity and is used during postural and endurance activities.

·      Fast twitch oxidative glycolytic IIAo utilizes glycogen (anaerobic) and oxygen (aerobic) as its energy sources and is strength endurance oriented, 2 to 3 minutes in duration and has an intensity of 25% to 60% of a person’s maximal strength capacity.

·      Fast twitch glycolytic IIA utilizes glycogen (anaerobic) as its primary energy source and is strength oriented, 13 to 30 seconds in duration and has an intensity of 60% to 85% of a person’s maximal strength capacity.

·      Fast twitch phosphogenic IIB utilizes creatine phosphate (CP) and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) (anaerobic) as its primary energy sources and is explosive-power oriented, 1 to 12 seconds in duration and has an intensity threshold of 85% to 100% of a person’s maximal strength capacity.

·      Examples: 25-50 mile race vs.800-1500 meters vs. 200-400 meters vs. 50-100 meters sprint.

9. Muscle Receptors and Sensors – within the muscles there are various receptors and sensors (proprioceptors) that perform specific tasks e.g.,

·      vestibular receptors- measure balance and equilibrium;

·      muscle spindle- measures change in muscle fiber length and change in muscle fiber speed;

·      Golgi tendon organ- measures the range of motion (rom) or stretch in muscle tendons;

·      Ruffini receptors- measures the position of the muscle and joint in relation to space;

·      Pacinian corpuscle- measures the tension and pressure within the muscle fiber and tendon.

·      All of these sensors relay information from the muscles to the spinal cord and/or to the brain or central nervous system. In turn the appropriate muscle response occurs. 

‘Train Safe, Smart, & Results Driven’

Training Principles, Part Two - Principles Of Exercise Science

By James Walker CCS, STM, BioSig, Master Trainer

There are quite a few scientific principles that apply to training. I will list some of my favorites that I use daily.

1. Central Nervous System Training (CNST) – is made up of the brain, spinal cord, nerve pathways, and sensors to the muscles and organs.

·      The impulse or signal to the muscles from the spinal cord is called neural drive, involving motor or efferent neurons, nerve fibers, motor units, motoneurons, and muscle fibers.

·      Things that interrupt and obstruct neural drive are poor posture, improper form, flexibility and strength imbalances, nerve injury, and scar tissue.

·      Demonstrate-ROM with proper vs. poor flexibility, seated rotation or elbow retraction

2. Critical Drop Off (CDO) – after the first set If the rep number drops by more than 2, e.g., from 6 to 3 reps or 20-30%, the particular exercise should be discontinued.

·      This drop off indicates neuromuscular exhaustion so stopping will prevent over training, reduce the possibility of injury, and allow the super compensation process to begin. So move on or continue with the next exercise.

3. Exercise Variation (EV) – by varying the exercises for each cycle over training and muscle imbalance can be significantly reduced.

·      For example during workout cycle one a flat chest press can be performed and for workout cycle two an incline press can be done.

·      Exercise variation may include changes in exercise selection, or changes in hand, foot, limb angle, or body position, and in apparatus type.

4. Faulty Muscle Recruitment (FMR) and Loading Patterns – faulty muscle recruitment occurs as a result of performing a task incorrectly and may be caused by:

·      Scar tissue present within the muscle which impedes its ability to function normally.

·      A muscle imbalance that effects the neural drive to the muscle.

·      Using too heavy a load so that the appropriate muscles can not perform the task.

·      Continuing to train while not addressing any of the previous issues or several other factors.

·      Remember how you practice will influence how you play and perform.

5. Faulty Loading Patterns (FLP) and Muscle Type Response – stability muscles also known as postural or tonic muscles tend to shorten and tighten under faulty or improper loading.

·      Their composition seems to be mostly slow twitch or IA type fibers.

·      While the dynamic, explosive, or phasic muscles tend to lengthen and weaken under faulty loading.

·      They seem to be made up of a predominance of fast twitch IIB and IIA fibers.

·      This is the general rule but some muscles may have dual roles and have a composition of several fiber types.

6. Muscle Action Response (MAR) – most muscles will be comprised of both fast and slow twitch fibers, however the percentages or ratios will vary based on genetics, and muscle group but training will affect it’s development.

·      E.g., fast vs. slow ratio may be 40:60 or 50:50 or 60:40 or 70:30, this will determine your athletic preference and possible physical training potential.

·      Muscles that flex joint angles like the arm and leg biceps tend to be comprised of mostly fast twitch fibers.

·      While muscles that extend the joint like the leg quadriceps and lower back erectors will have a greater endurance capacity.

·      Remember this is the general rule, individuals need to be tested to determine their specific muscle response.

‘Train Safe, Smart, & Results Driven’

Training Principles, Part One - Types Of Strength

By James Walker CCS, STM, Biosig, Master Trainer

There is more than one type of strength, therefore there is more than one way to strength train. Below I’ve listed some of the basic types. If you’re not familiar review and think about how each one can be applied. Of course some seems similar and could potentially overlap in application. This article is also the part of my 'Training Principles' article series, part one of nine.

  1. Absolute Strength-is the maximal amount of force an individual can produce, regardless of their bodyweight and time involved, as in the shot put and contact between football linemen.
  2. Endurance Strength or Muscular Endurance-is the amount of force an individual can produce over a longer period of time while resisting fatigue as in rowing, swimming, distance running, and cross-country skiing.
  3. Maximal Strength-is the maximal amount of force an individual can produce in a single maximal contraction or effort, regardless of the time involved as in weightlifting, shot putting, hammer throwing, caber tossing, etc.
  4. Optimal Strength-is the maximal amount of strength that an individual needs to perform their sport optimally and will vary from sport to sport, as in power lifting or weightlifting vs. table tennis or squash.
  5. Relative Strength-is the maximum amount of force an individual can produce at a given bodyweight or weight class (per lb or kg), regardless of the time involved as in skiing, gymnastics, bobsledding, figure sating, cycling and wrestling, boxing, weight lifting or weight class sports. Thus it is the relationship between maximal strength and body mass and is beneficial when increasing an athlete’s strength while maintaining their bodyweight.
  6. Speed Strength or Power-is the ability to produce the most force in the shortest amount of time or to overcome the resistance in the shortest amount of time as in sprinting, kicking, sprint cycling, sprint rowing, ice-skating, kayaking, etc There are three components of speed strength-explosive, reactive, and starting strength.
  • Explosive Strength-is the ability to increase force after a movement has been initiated or the rate at which an individual can achieve maximal force as in the shot put, hammer throw, judo throw, or wrestle take down.
  • Reactive Strength-is the ability to quickly change from an eccentric contraction to a concentric contraction as in the high jump, long jump, triple jump, volleyball, and basketball.
  • Starting Strength-is the ability to produce maximal force at the start of a muscular contraction or to overcome resistance when initiating movement as in sprint start, bat swing, paddle swing. It is especially a key determinant of performance in sports where the resistance to overcome is relatively light as in table tennis.

 ‘Train Safe, Smart, & Results Driven’

 

Olympic Lifts In The Gym!

By James Walker CCS, STM, Biosig, Master Trainer

Olympic lifting! Olympic lifts and their variations such as the clean, clean and jerk, deadlift, jerk press, power pulls, snatch, etc are great exercises for athletics, fitness, and structural balance. When performed correctly they yield precise crossover results for jumping, power, speed, sports, and structural strength.

I see trainers and athletes performing them but with incorrect concept and technique that does something altogether different or that may lead to an injury.

YouTube and the web have great instructional videos now, that explain the concept and correct technique. Please search these: Tommy Kono-former Olympic weightlifter,   coach, and judge, has a six part series; Chad Ikei-former Olympic weightlifter and strength-performance coach, has a two part series; Cara Head-retired Olympic weightlifter, now coach, has several training videos; All Things Gym; Barbell Shrugged; Breaking Muscle; Catalyst Athletics; and Power Clean Bible; all have very clear instructional videos, along with written commentary.

‘Train Safe, Smart, & Results Driven’ 

WHY TRAIN WITH AE CREATING ELITE?

By James Walker CCS, STM, BioSig, Master Trainer

Q: Why should I pay for your service when I can get a similar service elsewhere for cheaper?

A: Sometimes externals look similar but they really are not under critical scrutiny. An example wouldbe similar to this analogy. I can build or purchase a kit car that looks like a Lamborgini (a top Italian Performance Automobile) for $25,000 compared to the $250,000 of a real Lamborgini. They may appear identical but under critical testing and performance on the track the real Lamborgini does 0-60 in 3seconds, 1/4 mile in11 seconds, and has a top speed of 210 mph while the kit car does 0-60 in 6 seconds, ¼ mile in 14 seconds and has a top speed of 150mph with some luck. On the outside they look almost identical but on the track there is a vast difference.

There are many trainers and coaches who can improve performance via conditioning and strengthening programs but can or do they optimally develop the athletes potential (see our new website commentary article)? Can or have they taken someone who’s career, contract, signing bonus, and national or international ranking depends on them performing at the highest level not just taking one to two tenths of a second off of a 40 yd time. We specialize in optimizing an Athletes performance and we know that our results and success will speak for itself.

For example, AE Creating Elite individually and collectively has done that repeatedly with many athletes at the highest level. We’ve also trained and mentored some of the areas top trainers as well. Some of our clients include:

·      NFL – Derek Cox (Jaguars, Chargers, & Vikings), Nick Sorenson (Rams, Jaguars, & Browns), Ed Thomas (Panther, & Jaguars), Regan Upshaw (Raiders, Redskins), Kevin Mitchell (49’rs, Saints, & Redskins), Renaldo Wynn (Panthers, Jaguars, & Redskins), Kato Sewanga (Redskins, Giants, & Colts), Leonard Stephens (Redskins), Steve Tate (Mountain Lions),

·      Arena – Nate Daniels (Richmond)

·      Semi-Pro - Marlow Morgan (Kings), Nick Sims (Kings), Scott Woodward (Kings), Luke Treaster (Kings), Payton Lamb (Kings), Jim Adkins (Kings), Jace Summer (Monarchs),

·      Marathon – Marny Gilluly (Reebok)

Bodybuilding - Jackie Horton (MD State); Ed Taylor (MD State); Yaz Boyum (IFBB Pro).

·      MLB - Mark Tugwell (Phillies),

·      PGA – Woody Fitzhugh (PGA), Will Britt (Myrtle Pro Golf Academy),

·      USAW - Cara Heads (USA Olympic Weight Lifter),

·      Rugby – Jason Kallivocas, Ian Purcell, Raoul Socher

·      Swimming – Peter Garrett ( Olympics)

·      Triathlon – John Pellerito, Lonnie Crittenden, Chuck Sarich

·      Fitness – Mary Perry ( ),

·      Military - Amelia McDermott (USAF), Rachel Forrest VMI), Daniel Behne (USNA), Gavin Forrest (Duke/USA)’ Alex Schade (Duke/USA)

·      Law Enforcement – Bill Kelmartin (Deputy Sheriff, First Sergeant); V. Forrest (*),

·      Attorneys / Lobbiest – Bernie Dietz (Dietz Law), Jim Conzelman (Baker Hostetler), John McGeehan (McGeehan & Associates), Walter Perkins (Attorney & Inventor), Margaret Pfeiffer (Sullivan & Cromwell), Jim Ackers (Sullivan & Cromwell), Marcia Gelman (Winston & Straughn), Gloria Malkin (US Justice Dept), Ron Platt (McGuire Woods), Evelyn Hurwich (Circumpolar Conservation Union), Ken Crerar (Council Of Insurance Agents & Brokers), Mike Dorsey (),

·      Ceo’s / Executives / Business Owners / Entrepreneurs – Yvette Lawless (Living Color), Lonnie Gaddy (Entrepreneur), Carlos Gavidia (Direct Connect), Kay Kendall (Centennial), Marc Palumbo (US Data Works), Joe Plumpe (Studio 39), CW Gilluly (Comtex), Greg Farmer (Nortel), Kay Kendall (Washington Ballet Board President), David Levine (Consultant), Patricia Ghiglino Lopez (Professional Restoration), Bill Miller (Washington Post), Jean Neal (Senate Chief Of Staff), Eugene Boyd (Library Of Congress),

·      HS & College :

§  Baseball – Grant Flowers (Carolina Coastal), Kyle Howell (Notre Dame Acadamy/Wagner C), Matt Burch (Notre Dame Acadamy/Naval Academy), Brett Spencer (Notre Dame Acadamy/Lewis Clarke St U), Joe Strange (Randolph Macon C), Mark Tugwell (VA Tech), Nick Grillo (Notre Dame Acadamy/William & Mary),

§  Basketball - Chris Kearney (Westfield HS/Catholic U), Drake Diamond (Centreville HS/Wheaton C), Andrew Lawless (Westfield HS), Jeff Baxter (U of MD), Steve Rivers (U of MD), Ben Coleman (U of MD), Len Bias (U of MD), Jeff Adkins (U of MD),

§  Football – Cole Downer (Clemson U), Jimmy Marten (VA Tech), Luke Bowanko (UVA), Andy Lewis (Syracuse U), Zach Glatter (Princeton), Jamey McClendon (Salisbury State), Martellus Braxton (Shaw U), PJ Donavon (Hampton U), Mike Sheil (Kings C), Pat Sheil (Centreville HS/Boston C), Hassan Dixon (Naval Academy Prep), Jamie Donovan (Utica C), Jason Salter (Washington). Anthony Codero (Shenandoah U),

§  Golf – Nick Grillo (Notre Dame Acadamy),

§  Lacrosse – Jimmy Cahill (Sidwell Friends/Lehigh U), Nick Betonti (Stonewall Jackson HS/Lynchburg), Joe Britt (Fairfax HS/Penn St), Michael Britt (Fairfax HS/UVA), Robby Battle (Woodberry/Naval Academy), Kevin Mayer (Duke), Paul Moline (Lynchburg), Jay Battle (Chantilly),

§  Softball – Patti Hinko (Pul VI/Duquesne U), Elizabeth Jones (Westfield HS/St Louis U), Carolyn Jones (Westfield HS/Boston C),

§  Soccer - Chelsea Walter (Longwood U),

§  Tennis - Ariel Burke (Bullis/Townsend U), Moriah Burke (Bullis/Townsend U),

§  Track & Field - Nikki Jenkins (Fauquier HS/JMU), Julie Strange (Loudon County HS/JMU), Ishmael Williams (Tuscarora HS)

§  Volleyball – Jenna Strange (Loudon County HS/William & Mary), Katrina Kirby (Loudon County HS/Queens U), Kelsey Hrebenach (Heritage HS/U of MD), Mallory Brickerd (Loudon County HS/William & Mary), Marguerite Hanna (Azusa Pacific U), Julianne Hanna (U of N.M.), Luke Reichel (Messiah C), Nathalia Suissa (Nortwood HS/NC St),

·      Training - Yaz Boyum (IFBB Pro Body Builder & YAZ inc), Gina Fortuna (Beyond Fitness), Petr Speight (PET), Owen Browne (Master Trainer WSC), Art Tapera (Art The Trainer), Tal Cottey (Master Trainer TSI), Bonnie Falbo (Coaching Express), Christopher Dabrowski (T-Fitness), Patti Cinelli (Health & Fitness Writer, Lecturer, & Trainer), Patricia Cosby Tawfik (Anti-Aging Exercise Specialist), David Park (NASM, BIOSG), Carla Morrison (Prophecy Fitness), Bobby Mellott (WSC, Reebok, Trainer, LA Fitness Director), and many others (see www.aecreatingelite.com website).  

Marvin Lewis vs. AE-Combine Preparation!

By James Walker CCS, STM, BioSig, Master Trainer

Theredzone.org, Joe Reedy of the Cincinnati Enquirer reports when it comes to evaluating talent in the draft, Bengals coach Marvin Lewis is always quick to point out “the film doesn’t lie”.

On Friday on Dan Dakich’s show in Indianapolis, Lewis did chide those who go through unusual steps of preparing for the combine, saying that the way most go about it is “asinine”.
 The Bengals did show last year, with the selection of Andre Smith, that a disastrous combine won’t wreck their chances of being selected. And for that case, neither does the pro day.
 Among other things from the interview, courtesy of our friends at Sports Radio Interviews:

On players who leave school to workout and prepare for the Combine: “The other one that just kills me is that they spend three or four years with a strength coach on a college campus and as soon as the season’s over they go somewhere else to some guy who doesn’t know them from a hole in the wall and pay this guy a bunch of money. It doesn’t make any sense at all. It used to be that they had to pay for it and now it’s part of the agent deal. They’ve cultivated a whole industry out of it. It doesn’t make sense. It’s actually asinine that if I go to school in Florida, now I have to go to Arizona to train. If I go to school in Arizona, I have to go to Georgia to train. These guys have the best facilities and the best people working with them year round and now all the sudden they got to go somewhere else. You don’t need to go away. A football player is a football player.”

On how much stock he puts in workouts at the Combine: “The workout becomes a confirmation for a lot of players. It’s got to be judged individually with the player. The number one thing is what that guy has done on his college campus. So as these college players who are going to be underclassmen who may be listening to your show should know to take stock in what they do on the football field their – junior and senior – their last two seasons and not get all caught up in what this is.”

On what the NFL Scouting Combine is: “This is just a confirmation; that I can run. I weigh this much. I’m smart enough. I can carry on a conversation. I can learn. I can understand. And I’m a good person.”

AE Response By James Walker

I respect Marvin Lewis and agree with his opinion about the best current evaluation of a prospective football payer is their game film. Although you can always find exceptions to this with those players with little or no game film such as Willy Parker, Mike Lewis, and Ray Crittenden to name a few.

I also agree that many college strength programs are top notch and do a wonderful job at preparing athletes. Though I disagree with Marvin’s premise that athletes shouldn’t seek out additional help to increase their stock especially since with the current system there is so much money and opportunity involved.

First, most college football programs involve over a 100 athletes it’s difficult to address the specific needs of individual players or a select group each week while neglecting everyone else.

Second, those athletes may have specific needs involving strength, speed, power, mobility, flexibility, agility, nutrition, technique, structural integrity, soft tissue health, etc. From a logistical perspective most of these issues cannot get addressed per individual. Therefore a critical evaluation or assessment is vital.

Third, If any of these specific needs is not addressed the athlete will be at a disadvantage and unable to display their best performance on possibly their biggest stage. Unfortunately some of them go into the combine, pro-day, or camp ill prepared by innocently overlooking their specific needs and is released. Many do not receive a second chance.

Again most college strength coaches or programs by themselves do not have the resources or time to address this individually. So under the current system the athlete needs to do whatever is legally or ethically necessary to increase their opportunity.

German Volume Workout @ Home! Part 2

By James Walker CCS, STM, BioSig, Master Trainer

German Volume Workout- For those of you who have some in home exercise equipment or who like to purchase some, i.e., physioball (Sissal USA) anti-burst which means if you happen to run over something sharp it won’t explode or burst like a balloon, and it will support 1,000-2,000lb, so it’s sturdy and safer than the cheaper ball. It will cost between $25-$40 and will last a long time. I still have a few that are over 13 years old and one that’s over 15.

Also having a few pairs of dumbbells would be nice, any combination from 5-40lb. If you’re on a budget, $50-$100, find a set of changeable dumbbells, that comes with 2 bars, 4 collars, and a variety of weight plates, 2.5lb, 5lb, 7.5lb, and 10lb, so you can make up your own combinations. Though if you have extra cash then purchase a set of quick-change dumbbells, either Power Blocks, Bowflex, Performance, Reebok, Stamina Versa, XMark, or similar ones. They take up less space and you just have to insert a pin or turn a dial to change the weight amount. They come in pairs of various sizes 5-20lb, 5-40lb, 5-80lb, 5-120lb, and may cost from $100-$1,2000. I would suggest that you shop around for the best price but also check out the reviews on the Internet or Youtube.

Download the German Volume Workout @ Home! Part 2 Excel spreadsheet to record your workout.

If you need a reminder of the explanations, terms, definitions, or more information about the German Volume, review the German Volume Workout@Home Part 1. Otherwise proceed to the example.

Four Day Workout Example:

Day 1 (Monday) â€“ 10 x 10

A.1. standing squat with a single dumbbell; tempo 4/302  – with feet hip width apart or slightly wider and dumbbell held against your chest, keep chin up and shoulders back, lower body down towards floor as far as possible on a 3-4 tempo and return to start position on a 2.

A.2. bent over row with dumbbells; tempo 4/302  – with feet hip width apart, hips pushed back as far as possible, torso bent over in a bow position, lower back arched, knees bent, and dumbbells by knee’s, pull dumbbells towards waist on a 2 tempo and return to start position on a 3-4.

Day 2 (Tue or Wed) â€“ 10 x 10

A.1. lying leg curl with physioball; tempo 4/302 – lying position with legs extended and heels on top of the physioball, hands by sides, raise hips up towards the ceiling as far as possible on a 1 tempo, pull physioball in towards hips on a 2 tempo, push out on a 3-4 tempo, and lower hips to floor on a 1 tempo.

A.2. standing or seated overhead press with dumbbells; tempo 4/302  – with feet hip width apart and dumbbells next to shoulders in a neutral grip (palms facing in), press dumbbells up towards the ceiling and to the back of the head on a 2 tempo and return to start position on a 3-4 tempo.

Day 3 (Thur or Fri) â€“ 10 x 10

A.1. standing sumo squat with a single dumbbell; tempo 4/302  – with feet in a wide stance with toes pointed slightly out, hold a single dumbbell down between your legs, lower torso down towards floor as far as possible on a 3-4 tempo and return to start position on a 2 tempo.

A.2. lying pullover on physioball with a single dumbbell; tempo 4/302  – lying with upper back on physioball, feet on the floor with knees bent about 90 degrees, hips raised, and single dumbbell raised towards the ceiling with a triangle grip on dumbbell, lower the dumbbell overhead and down towards the floor as far as possible on a 3-4 tempo, keep elbows slightly bent, and return  to start position on a 2 tempo.

Day 4 (Fri or Sun) â€“ 10 x 10

A.1. standing romanian deadlift (rdl) with dumbbells; tempo 4/302  – with feet hip width apart and dumbbells at sides, keep chest up and shoulders back, push hips back as far as possible and bend torso forward towards the floor (bow position) on a 3-4 tempo and return to start position on a 2 tempo.

A.2. lying chest press on physioball with dumbbells; tempo 4/302  – lying with upper back on physioball, feet on the floor with knees bent about 90 degrees, hips raised, and dumbbells next to shoulders in a neutral grip, press the dumbbells up towards the ceiling on a 2 tempo and return to start position on a 3-4 tempo.

Again, remember and take your time if you are just beginning, especially if you haven’t worked out in a while. Start with 5 sets of 10 reps and gradually build up to 10 sets over a 5 week duration. Each set should take 50-60 seconds followed by a 15-60 second rest period. The entire workout should take between 20-40 minutes depending on the length of your rest periods.  This workout can be done for about 16 weeks If you are truly a beginner or novice.

German Volume Workout @ Home! Part 1

By James Walker CCS, STM, BioSig, Master Trainer

I've wanted to write this article for some time because I think it would help give direction to those who have wanted to work out but maybe lacked direction or a facility or equipment. The German Volume (GV) workout is famous for increasing metabolic rate, natural Growth Hormone production, muscle growth, and fat loss. Since it uses a lower intensity or resistance level, it’s a great way to jump-start a fitness-weight-loss program.

The German Volume uses an intensity or resistance load that is about 60% of a 1 rep max (1RM) for that given exercise, e.g., if you could bench press 100lb for a one rep then you would use 60lb to start the German Volume. Another way to determine the starting resistance is to choose a resistance or exercise or weight that you could do for 20 reps but you you’ll only be doing 10. So, if you can do 20 push-ups that’s a perfect exercise.

Another key component of the German Volume is performing 10 reps of 10 sets or 10 x 10 for the exercise, which helps to create the volume and the physiological response, i.e., metabolic elevation, growth hormone production, muscle growth, and fat loss. For a de-conditioned person this may seem like a lot but it can easily be modified to suit their starting level. A beginner may start with 5 sets of 10 reps and add one set each week until 10 sets is reached during the next 5 weeks. Continue with the10 sets for the next 11 weeks or 16 weeks total.

One intention of this program is to make it do-able, convenient, and accessible for the participant to do in their home or when away, that doesn’t require a facility or a membership or any expensive equipment. To be most beneficial this program should be performed four times a week. This can be done on a Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, Friday schedule or a Monday, Wednesday, Friday, Sunday schedule.

Download the German Volume Workout @ Home! Part 1 Excel spreadsheet to record your workout.

Below is a brief description of terms followed by a four-day workout example.

Terms:

  • A.1 & A.2 – rank or order of the exercises performed together; also called superset e.g., perform a set of 10 reps for exercise A.1, then does a set of 10 reps for exercise A.2; rest 15-60 seconds and repeat the sequence until all 10 sets are completed.
  • Repetition (rep) – is each time a movement of an exercise is performed, either singularly or consecutively.
  • Set – a group of reps performed together followed by a brief or long rest interval.
  • Tempo – is the rate or seconds that it takes to performed the rep, this regulates the movement, enhances muscle fiber recruitment, reduces injury, and controls the amount of time under tension (TUT) of the muscle; Tempo or TUT is expressed numerically i.e., 302; 302 equals 3+0+2=5 seconds of TUT to perform one rep or 50 seconds of TUT to perform 10 reps (or one set of 10 reps); 402=6 seconds of TUT for one rep or 60 seconds of TUT to complete 10 reps.
  • 3 is the negative muscle contraction of the movement and is the lowering phase when pulling or pressing; e.g., lowering down in a squat or push up.
  • 0 is the middle phase of the movement; e.g., top or bottom position of a squat or push up.
  • 2 is the positive muscle contraction of the movement and is the raising phase when pulling or pressing; e.g., raising up in a squat or push up.

 

Four Day Workout Example:

Day 1 (Monday) â€“ 10 x 10

A.1. standing bodyweight squat; tempo 4/302  – with feet hip width apart or slightly wider and hands on waist, lower body down towards floor as far as possible on a 3-4 tempo and return to start position on a 2 tempo.

A.2. incline pull up with towel or rope with a knot on the end (requires a secure door or rail or banister); tempo 4/302  – wedge middle of a folded towel between door and door frame, shut, secure, or lock the door so it doesn’t open and will safely support your body weight; or wrap a towel around a rail or banister that’s strong and sturdy enough to support your weight; hold the ends of the towel in each hand and position feet on floor close to the bottom of door or rail, lean body away from the door as far as possible, support your weight with the towel and your arms, pull body up and hands to chest on a 2 tempo and return to start position on a 3-4 tempo.

Day 2 (Tue or Wed) â€“ 10 x 10

A.1. lying bent knee hip lift; tempo 4/302 – lying position with feet on the floor or elevated on a step or chair (more difficult), knees bent 90 degrees, raise hips and torso up towards the ceiling as far as possible on a 2 tempo and return to start position on a 3-4 tempo.

A.2. push up against a wall or on the floor; tempo 4/302  – with hands against the wall, feet hip width apart appro